Err

Blue Tourmaline & Mica, in Feldspar (No.131)

£ 40.00
Add to cart
Blue Tourmaline & Mica, in Feldspar (No.131)Blue Tourmaline & Mica, in Feldspar

Measurements Approx.
Height - 4.9 cm
Width - 4.2 cm
Length - 7 cm



Tourmaline is one of the most significant mineral groups for metaphysical use, and it includes a wide variety of different forms, colours and energy spectrums.


Tourmaline is a complex aluminium borosilicate, its crystal pattern is hexagonal (trigonal) with prismatic crystals and striations running parallel to the main axis.

No other gemstone has such wide variations in colours. Tourmaline can be red, pink, yellow, brown, black and various shades of green, are called Watermelon Tourmaline.




The mica group of sheet silicate minerals includes several closely related materials having nearly perfect basal cleavage. All are monoclinic, with a tendency towards pseudohexagonal crystals, and are similar in chemical composition. The nearly perfect cleavage, which is the most prominent characteristic of mica, is explained by the hexagonal sheet-like arrangement of its atoms.


The word mica is derived from the Latin word mica, meaning a crumb, and probably influenced by micare, to glitter.




The name feldspar derives from the German Feldspat, a compound of the words Feld, "field", and Spat, "a rock that does not contain ore". The change from Spat to -spar was influenced by the English word "spar", a synonym for "mineral". "Feldspathic" refers to materials that contain feldspar. The alternate spelling, felspar, has largely fallen out of use.


Feldspars are a group of rock-forming tectosilicate minerals that make up as much as 60% of the Earth;s crust.

Feldspars crystallise from magma as veins in both intrusive and extrusive igneous rocks and are also present in many types of metamorphic rock.

Share